Monthly Archives: September 2016

3D printed Miriam device can detect dozens of cancers using a single blood sample

Cancer seems to become more and more prevalent in the modern world, and few people have not lost a loved one or family member to the disease. Fortunately medical researchers are fighting back hard, and even 3D printing technology has a role to play. For medical startup Miroculus has been working on a very precise 3D printed blood test device called the Miriam, which can detect early stage cancer using nothing more than a small blood sample. And as cancer is best fought as early as possible, this kind of accessible diagnostics tool could become a real life saver.

Laser Cut Toys For The Big Boys

Serious Fun With Drones And Robots

laser-cut-robots-bider-letsmakerobots

What is it about building robots that is so much fun? If you ask a kid, you will likely get a meaningful answer… however when it comes to grown men the wide-eyed fascination of youth has developed into a serious pursuit of quirky techno-novelty. In recent years, drones have joined the venerable robot as one of the top projects for big boys to tinker away at.

Through laser cutting, the design process for both drones and robots is streamlined and fully functional prototypes are just a mouse click away.      

The Robot Uprising

Laser cut robots take on many forms, often with a principle function driving the design of structural elements. A good example is the four-legged robot walker pictured above, from user hardmouse on Let’s Make Robots. Laser cut MDF body and leg segments support the servos and electronics which enable the robot to move at an impressive pace across smooth surfaces.

When speed is the priority, wheels are the way to go. The distinctive neon green acrylic glows along laser cut edges of the MURCS wheeled robot (below, left) by Robot Freak. This little robot moves about in much the same way as a robot vacuum, and is primed and ready to taunt cats (amongst other important tasks).

A robot of a different sort, Brian Roe’s Roy the Robot was lovingly constructed with education in mind. Here we see one raised hand (below, right), highlighting the detail and precision that enabled Roy to win over so many hearts on Kickstarter and beyond.

lasercut-robots-collage-3laser-cut-robots-collage-1

Inspired by the stately and graceful Strandbeests from Theo Jansen, the laser cut acrylic walker from 4volt (above, bottom-left) has an organic locomotion that is beautiful to watch. Returning to a more traditional robotic mechanism, the grasper claw and robotic arm (above, bottom-right) from letsmake.org is one of those ‘learning tools’ that would be a lot of fun to subvert and get up to mischief with.

lasercut-robots-collage-5

As well as being the focus of much amusement, robots can also provide practical help. The Etch-a-Sketch Bot is perfect for times when your thumbs are worn out from an etch-a-sketch marathon (above, left) and the unusual cardboard ninja robot by romanjurt on Thingiverse (above, right) dispenses smarties while rolling its eyes at you.

Laser cut projects sometimes take on a robot persona without the need for any mechanism or mechanical parts. For example, the laser cut bamboo critters from Dickson Chow (below) are actually sophisticated moisture monitoring devices that will alert you when your house plants start to run dry.laser-cut-robots-water-alertrobots-lasercut-chibipocket

Sometimes it is enough to be robot-shaped and cute. No moving parts, no cogs or gears or electronic components. The delightful Chibipocket series (above) are full of character and help to remind the big boys of where this fascination with robots all began.

 

Taking Flight With Laser Cut Dronesdrones-lasercut-octocopter

Drone enthusiasts are getting pretty excited about the latest commercial products, but that doesn’t hold these guys back from having a go with their own DIY laser cut drones. The octocopter pictured above from Jared Reabow on Instructables is a part of a range that includes cleverly resolved gimbals robust enough to support a full sized DSLR camera.

laser-cut-drones-collage-1

Laser cut acrylic is ideal for drone components. Pictured above are two ‘mini racing’ drone chassis. The red acrylic of the partially assembled unit from DIY Drones (above, left) and the smooth contours of the clear acrylic version (above, right) from Whiplash42 present a refined visual that laser cut wood can only dream of.

Continuing on this theme, the acrylic drone with built in blade guards from Banana_Science on Thingiverse (below, left) is frugal indeed with a parts and material cost of just $100. Another interesting direction for laser cut drones is to further accessorise and enhance commercial drone products. The transparent acrylic crash guard (below, right) from Phantom Pilots attaches to a DJI drone and shields expensive camera equipment from being a point of impact if the drone crashes.laser-cut-drones-collage-2

For the first-timer, it is a good idea to follow through step-by-step with an existing project that has proven success. When it comes to drones, the Shendrone by Andy Shen (below) is cost effective with structural material laser cut from bamboo ply, and a snap-fit assembly means no glues or screws to slow down the construction process.

drones-lasercut-shendrone

Whether you’re building a two, four or ten-legged walker or a zippy DIY drone, laser cutting enables highly resolved outcomes quickly and at low cost. As we’ve seen in this small collection of examples, there is a broad scope for what can be considered a ‘robot’, and while drones require a tighter focus so that they can actually get off the ground, there is still a healthy variability in design options and materials.

Do you have ideas for a clever robot or drone that can be laser cut in the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below!

 

The post Laser Cut Toys For The Big Boys appeared first on Ponoko.

Laser Cut Toys For The Big Boys

Serious Fun With Drones And Robots

laser-cut-robots-bider-letsmakerobots

What is it about building robots that is so much fun? If you ask a kid, you will likely get a meaningful answer… however when it comes to grown men the wide-eyed fascination of youth has developed into a serious pursuit of quirky techno-novelty. In recent years, drones have joined the venerable robot as one of the top projects for big boys to tinker away at.

Through laser cutting, the design process for both drones and robots is streamlined and fully functional prototypes are just a mouse click away.      

The Robot Uprising

Laser cut robots take on many forms, often with a principle function driving the design of structural elements. A good example is the four-legged robot walker pictured above, from user hardmouse on Let’s Make Robots. Laser cut MDF body and leg segments support the servos and electronics which enable the robot to move at an impressive pace across smooth surfaces.

When speed is the priority, wheels are the way to go. The distinctive neon green acrylic glows along laser cut edges of the MURCS wheeled robot (below, left) by Robot Freak. This little robot moves about in much the same way as a robot vacuum, and is primed and ready to taunt cats (amongst other important tasks).

A robot of a different sort, Brian Roe’s Roy the Robot was lovingly constructed with education in mind. Here we see one raised hand (below, right), highlighting the detail and precision that enabled Roy to win over so many hearts on Kickstarter and beyond.

lasercut-robots-collage-3laser-cut-robots-collage-1

Inspired by the stately and graceful Strandbeests from Theo Jansen, the laser cut acrylic walker from 4volt (above, bottom-left) has an organic locomotion that is beautiful to watch. Returning to a more traditional robotic mechanism, the grasper claw and robotic arm (above, bottom-right) from letsmake.org is one of those ‘learning tools’ that would be a lot of fun to subvert and get up to mischief with.

lasercut-robots-collage-5

As well as being the focus of much amusement, robots can also provide practical help. The Etch-a-Sketch Bot is perfect for times when your thumbs are worn out from an etch-a-sketch marathon (above, left) and the unusual cardboard ninja robot by romanjurt on Thingiverse (above, right) dispenses smarties while rolling its eyes at you.

Laser cut projects sometimes take on a robot persona without the need for any mechanism or mechanical parts. For example, the laser cut bamboo critters from Dickson Chow (below) are actually sophisticated moisture monitoring devices that will alert you when your house plants start to run dry.laser-cut-robots-water-alertrobots-lasercut-chibipocket

Sometimes it is enough to be robot-shaped and cute. No moving parts, no cogs or gears or electronic components. The delightful Chibipocket series (above) are full of character and help to remind the big boys of where this fascination with robots all began.

 

Taking Flight With Laser Cut Dronesdrones-lasercut-octocopter

Drone enthusiasts are getting pretty excited about the latest commercial products, but that doesn’t hold these guys back from having a go with their own DIY laser cut drones. The octocopter pictured above from Jared Reabow on Instructables is a part of a range that includes cleverly resolved gimbals robust enough to support a full sized DSLR camera.

laser-cut-drones-collage-1

Laser cut acrylic is ideal for drone components. Pictured above are two ‘mini racing’ drone chassis. The red acrylic of the partially assembled unit from DIY Drones (above, left) and the smooth contours of the clear acrylic version (above, right) from Whiplash42 present a refined visual that laser cut wood can only dream of.

Continuing on this theme, the acrylic drone with built in blade guards from Banana_Science on Thingiverse (below, left) is frugal indeed with a parts and material cost of just $100. Another interesting direction for laser cut drones is to further accessorise and enhance commercial drone products. The transparent acrylic crash guard (below, right) from Phantom Pilots attaches to a DJI drone and shields expensive camera equipment from being a point of impact if the drone crashes.laser-cut-drones-collage-2

For the first-timer, it is a good idea to follow through step-by-step with an existing project that has proven success. When it comes to drones, the Shendrone by Andy Shen (below) is cost effective with structural material laser cut from bamboo ply, and a snap-fit assembly means no glues or screws to slow down the construction process.

drones-lasercut-shendrone

Whether you’re building a two, four or ten-legged walker or a zippy DIY drone, laser cutting enables highly resolved outcomes quickly and at low cost. As we’ve seen in this small collection of examples, there is a broad scope for what can be considered a ‘robot’, and while drones require a tighter focus so that they can actually get off the ground, there is still a healthy variability in design options and materials.

Do you have ideas for a clever robot or drone that can be laser cut in the Ponoko Personal Factory? Let us know in the comments below!

 

The post Laser Cut Toys For The Big Boys appeared first on Ponoko.

Austrocasa developing RoboVAST construction 3D Printer that prints in clay, concrete mix, ceramics, wood

Slowly but certainly, the construction industry is waking up to the opportunities of 3D printing. Especially huge concrete 3D printing robots are already proving their worth in a variety of research projects, with Chinese company WinSun already 3D printing entire homes, apartments and courtyards. Various other companies are following suit, and just last week Swiss construction giant LafargeHolcim and French startup XtreeE successfully 3D printed Europe’s first structural element in concrete.

US Marine test: 3D printed munition proved to be more lethal than conventional

Could 3D printers be going to war? It certainly seems that way, as 3D printing is increasingly being adopted by the military branches of governments around the world – mostly as a spare part manufacturing tool. The US Marine Corps (USMC) is a particularly big believer in this 3D printing application, and just this year, the Marines of 1st Maintenance Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 15, 1st Marine Logistics Group, announced that they were using 3D printers to produce replacement parts for broken equipment. This summer, the USMC revealed to be breathing new life into obsolete and broken aircraft through 3D printing. But now the Marines are taking things even further, as it has just been revealed that they have successfully tested 3D printed munition.

Colombian e-NABLE shares Snow Queen, Ninja, Cinderella, Iron Man themed 3D printed hand files

Of all the 3D printing enterprises around the world, e-NABLE is arguably the kindest and most important. Over the past four years or so, the e-NABLE Community of Volunteers have been developing a vast amount of 3D printable and low-cost hand prostheses for the people who need them most of all. They are also focused on giving children with missing limbs, regardless of where in the world they live, a chance at a normal life through functional and affordable prosthetics. Earlier this year, they launched a 3D printable prosthesis design that enables kids to safely engage in physical sports.

Medical Breakthrough With 3D Printed ‘Hyperelastic’ Bone

The possible healthcare advantages of 3d printing technology are well-known. You’ve probably read at least one story about how additive manufacturing technology is used in medicine. Dental implants and prosthetics are among many applications of 3d printing in this field. Hyperelastic Bone In a huge leap for medical science and 3d printing, researchers at an […]

The post Medical Breakthrough With 3D Printed ‘Hyperelastic’ Bone appeared first on 3D Printing.

Filamentarno plastic CERAMO and CERAMO-TEX filaments bring ceramic 3D printing to desktops

Ceramic 3D printing is one of the coolest things out there, and who doesn’t dream of 3D printing bottles, clean statues and solid engineering components? Unfortunately, clays are 3D printed under very specific circumstances and are usually not compatible with desktop plastics 3D printing setups at all. Russian filament manufacturers Filamentarno has therefore decided to develop the next best thing: a plastic that mimics the properties of ceramics, including the fantastic surface finishing options and extreme toughness.