Monthly Archives: Februar 2015

LinkBits: 3D Printing News for the Week of February 28th

By Michael Molitch-Hou

Another week, another round of LinkBits: your source for brief bits of news from the 3D printing industry. The industry is booming and so are we, so here is a list of stories that we couldn’t quite fit into our complete article schedule for the week.  Bon Appéprint!
Bioprinting Enters Oxford English Dictionary

Along with all of the other gibberish that has been added to our language, made increasingly incomprehensible from the distortion of reality caused by technological development, is the word “bioprinting”. …

The original post LinkBits: 3D Printing News for the Week of February 28th appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Tampa Bay Photo Studio Becomes the Latest to Move Into 3D

By Davide Sher

We said before that 2015 might be, among other things, the year where photogrammetric 3D scanning based 3D printed portraits will make their way into photographic studios worldwide. Cool Dims, a studio in the Tampa Bay area in Florida, has become the latest to add 3D printed portrait capabilities through, leveraging on its previous experience as professional portrait photographers.

The new 3D Portrait Studio uses a custom camera rig capable of taking photographs from 92 different angles in just a split second.…

The original post Tampa Bay Photo Studio Becomes the Latest to Move Into 3D appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Closing the Sustainability Cycle with InnoCirlce Recycled 3D Printing Filaments

By Michael Molitch-Hou

It’s now been obvious for some time that humanity is living outside of its means, causing potentially irreversible damage to the climate, consuming the last drops of finite resources, and producing huge amounts of waste. Though only a component of the drastic effects that the species is having on the planet, the amount of plastic humans waste is shameful. A University of Georgia study said that of the 275 million tons of plastic produced in 2010, about eight million tons wound up in the ocean, obstructing the airways of marine life and poisoning the water with toxins.…

The original post Closing the Sustainability Cycle with InnoCirlce Recycled 3D Printing Filaments appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

3D Printed Wind Turbines Help Remote Communities Gain Sustainable Power

By James Lefebvre

When it comes to energy, finding a sustainable clean energy alternative to fossil fuels is one of the most talked about engineering challenges. Wind power is a very popular alternative due to its lack of emissions, and it can be applied to virtually any environment. While we’re working to develop mass-scale clean power solutions, it’s often forgotten that there are still many communities that don’t have any access to power.

The David McFadden Energy Entrepreneur Challenge, a yearly energy challenge organized by the Ontario Centers of Excellence, is working to help bring power to everybody.…

The original post 3D Printed Wind Turbines Help Remote Communities Gain Sustainable Power appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

3D Printing Expert Econolyst Forms Stratasys Strategic Consulting Division

By Michael Molitch-Hou

Upon consolidating its 3D printing and manufacturing services into a single division, Stratasys Direct Manufacturing, Stratasys is expanding its role as a service provider from producing parts for businesses to providing expert consulting services.  Econolyst, an industry-leading consultancy and research firm based in the UK, has just joined the company to form the new Stratasys Strategic Consulting Division.
Econolyst is headed up by Dr. Phil Reeves, who has been providing key 3D printing expertise in the field for the past twenty years. …

The original post 3D Printing Expert Econolyst Forms Stratasys Strategic Consulting Division appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

How To Make Glue-less Interlocking Parts

Using the SketchUp plugin SliceModeler for the best friction fit

There are several ways to create 3D shapes from flat laser cut material, and each have their merits. Many Ponoko users ask questions about how to best design for interlocking parts – making this one of the more popular choices for transforming laser cut forms into 3D objects.

Interlocking parts can be mechanically fastened together, but in this tutorial we are looking at how to design friction-fit connections that neatly snap and lock into place.

Pictured above is a laser cut trivet made by Ponoko user Andrew Jones. To produce this form he used the freely available software SketchUp along with the handy SliceModeler plugin. He then compiled a detailed Instructables walkthrough that outlines his design process for interlocking laser cut products.

To achieve the glue-less design, small curved bumps (nodes) are added into each slot. This extra material allows the parts to slide together with enough contact and pressure to fit snugly. This sounds easy enough, but just how to get the right size and number of nodes takes some time and patience. Slot length, material thickness and density are just a few of the factors that need to be considered.

I highly recommend creating parts with different size and numbers of nodes so you can find the best fit that works for you. You might want a very hard fit that needs to be tapped together with a rubber mallet or you might want a fit that can be assembled by hand without any tools. The only way to find the fit that works for you is try different size nodes.

Click through to the full tutorial where you will learn how to create a basic form using Sketchup and SliceModeler, add the nodes, export into Inkscape and then add the final SVG to a Ponoko template ready for laser cutting.

via Andrew Jones on Instructables

Complex Separation of Conjoined Twins Successfully Planned with 3D Printing

By Michael Molitch-Hou

We’ve covered many stories in which 3D printing has aided in the planning of surgeries, with patient-specific, 3D printed models cutting surgery time drastically by providing doctors with a detailed visual representation of the areas in which they are about to operate.  Today, however, we report on the first time that the practice has been implemented in the risky procedure of separating conjoined twins.

According to the University of Maryland, the survival rates of conjoined twins are often low, between 5 and 25%, and the surgery to separate them can yield difficult challenges, particularly in the case of those that share vital organs, with one twin surviving 75% of the time. …

The original post Complex Separation of Conjoined Twins Successfully Planned with 3D Printing appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Ultra-lab 3D prints 7000 words as a tribute to Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez

While people say a picture says more than a thousand words, there are some writers out there that can do more than pictures ever can. Writers that, through their words, can shake not just the foundations of literature itself but also of society, politics and philosophy.

This article Ultra-lab 3D prints 7000 words as a tribute to Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez is first published at 3ders.org.