Monthly Archives: November 2014

Xploration Earth 2050 Explores 3D Printing

By 3D Printing Industry

Xploration Earth 2050 is an educational tv program that covers emerging technology. In a recent episode, the host Joe Penna takes a look at 3d printing and how it is used in education. This three minute clip gives a short introduction into the subject matter, but if you want to learn more, you can catch the whole episode at Hulu.

Xploration Earth 2050: 3D Printing from NVBOTS on Vimeo.…

The original post Xploration Earth 2050 Explores 3D Printing appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Attaching a 3D printer to a microscope? Spanish scientist 3D prints a microscopic image of Hydrogel

3D printed objects can be absolutely huge, providing that your print bed can handle it. Just look at this giant Marvin Mascot we reported on this week. But that doesn’t mean that everything just needs to get bigger and bigger; value and significance aren’t inherent to large sizes. Small objects and small projects can be very valuable as well, as the a new project by Spanish Andrés Gómez illustrates.

This article Attaching a 3D printer to a microscope? Spanish scientist 3D prints a microscopic image of Hydrogel is first published at 3ders.org.

BigRep Receives Significant Funding For The 1.3 m³ Build Volume 3D Printer

By Shane Taylor

There are a growing number of large-scale RepRap derivative FFF 3D printers. The company behind one of the best-of-this-particular-bunch of industrial scale machines, Berlin-based BigRep, has just received seed capital funding, only eleven months into the history of the company. The printer has a large enough build volume to produce furniture such as chairs, large replacement parts, and industrial-sized prototypes. BigRep has ambitious expansion plans, which the seed financing will be a significant step towards facilitating.
New investors include the KfW Development Bank via its “ERP Fund Program” and an experienced group of Business Angels, among them renowned venture capital investor Dr.…

The original post BigRep Receives Significant Funding For The 1.3 m³ Build Volume 3D Printer appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Doctors Successfully Complete First Procedures with MySpine 3D Printed Surgical Guides

By Scott J Grunewald

Joint and spine surgical product manufacturer Medacta USA announced the successful completion of the first two spinal surgeries in the United States using its MySpine Patient-Matched Technology. MySpine uses 3D reconstruction and rapid 3D printing technology to create patient-specific guides used in extremely complicated spinal deformation reparative surgeries.
MySpine is intended to increase efficiency and accuracy as well as help improve the chances of positive outcomes of spinal procedures. The 3D printed guides help identify the optimal screw trajectories and entry points into the specific vertebrae that are being operated on.…

The original post Doctors Successfully Complete First Procedures with MySpine 3D Printed Surgical Guides appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Most Read Articles from Last Week – November 29

By 3D Printing Industry

James Chang is Working on the Biggest CMYKW 3D Printer Known to Humanity
What do you do when you’ve retired as a mechanical engineer? You build a giant, five-color 3D printer. At least, that’s what you do if you’re James Chang. The 45-year-old Taiwanese engineer has been…

MakerBot Announces Black Friday and Cyber Monday 3D Printer Sales
As if to celebrate a month of reaching out to ever greater numbers of consumers, MakerBot has announced reduced prices on their MakerBot Replicator and MakerBot Replicator Mini Compact 3D Printers.…

The original post Most Read Articles from Last Week – November 29 appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Protect your quality beers with this 3D printed bottle lock

3D printing is about creating solutions. From giant medical innovations to small components that need to be replaced, 3D printing technology is an ideal tool for developing original, fun or even life-saving solutions. And as the Holiday Season is once again upon us, one Instructrables designer has shared a solution for a problem that plagues many a household in this time of year: how do you protect your most precious (craft) beers from your thirsty family members?

This article Protect your quality beers with this 3D printed bottle lock is first published at 3ders.org.

Kids Creation Station start-up transforms your kids’ artwork into 3D printed sculptures

Digital technology, like cloud services, are creating wonderful and durable alternatives for letters and photographs, ensuring that fire or ignorance will never destroy meaningful moments. But did you know that 3D printing can also be used to give more durable shapes to precious drawings?

This article Kids Creation Station start-up transforms your kids’ artwork into 3D printed sculptures is first published at 3ders.org.

Geschäftsidee – Kinderzeichnungen in 3D-Modelle verwandeln und ausdrucken

Kinderzeichnung von einem Monster

Kinderzeichnung in 3D-Modelle zu verwandeln und anschließend mit dem 3D-Drucker zu drucken lautet die Geschäftsidee der Startup-Online-Anwendung “Kid’s Creation Station” (KCS). Genial. Und die Ergebnisse sind tatsächlich beeindruckend. Nur ein Haken hat die Sache (im Moment noch).

Logo Kids Creation Station (KCS)Mit der Online-Anwendung Kid´s Creation Station (KCS) ist jetzt eine Anwendung gestartet, die Zeichnungen von Kindern in digitale 3D-Modelle verwandelt und anschließend mit einem 3D-Drucker gedruckt werden können. Bei KCS handelt es sich um einen Teil der 3DP4E (“3D Printing for Everyone” (Anm. d. Redaktion: “3D-Druck für jeden”), die sich mit Sketchfab und ZBrush zur Umsetzung dieser innovativen Idee zusammengeschlossen haben.

Bewegtes 3D-ObjektDie Funktionsweise der KCS-Anwendung ist sehr einfach gestaltet. Die Zeichnung ihres Kindes müssen Eltern nur fotografieren und das Foto mit der KCS Android-App auf den Server hochladen. Erfahrene Mitarbeiter bei KCS verwandeln das Bild in ein 3D-Modell, welches anschließend in ein physisch greifbares 3D-Objekt ausgedruckt wird. Die Modelle haben eine Größe von vier Zentimetern und bestehen aus einem Sandsteinmaterial.

Der Haken an KCS: Die Kosten für die Nutzung des KCS-Service sind mit 100 US-Dollar pro Stück für das erste 3D-Kunstwerk sehr hoch. Den größten Teil der Gebühr erhalten die Designer, da sie die 2D-Zeichnung in ein 3D-Modell umwandeln. Jeder weitere 3D-Druck der gleichen Kinderzeichnung wird mit nur noch 60 US-Dollar berechnet. Die Kunden erhalten den 3D-Ausdruck ihrer Zeichnung innerhalb von vier Wochen nach Auftragsvergabe per Post oder Paketdienst zugesandt. Weitere Informationen erhalten Sie auf der Website der Kid’s Creation Station.

Kinderzeichnung von einem Monster

Aus einer Kinderzeichnung in 2D wird mit der Kid’s Creation Station und einem 3D-Drucker ein physisches 3D-Objekt (Bild © kidscreationstation.com).

Wer unsere News zum 3D-Druck regelmäßig verfolgt (vor allem die Abonnenten von unserem kostenlosen 3D-Drucker-Newsletter), wird bemerkt haben, dass Unternehmen, Anwendungen und Tools und Hardware zum 3D-Druck für Kinder wie Pilze aus den Boden sprießen. Im Juni 2014 wurde mit dem Printeer der erste 3D-Drucker für Kinder ab 12 Jahren vorgestellt. Der Drucker ist für 549 US-Dollar erhältlich, bietet eine einfache Bedienung und verwendet PLA als Druckmaterial. Die Serienproduktion beim Hersteller Mission Street Manufacturing startete im Oktober 2014.

DIY 3D printable Raman spectrometer could provide cheap & early detection of hazardous chemicals

For most of us, 3D printing is simply a fun tool and creative outlet for any little fun project that we come across. But it goes without saying that 3D printing is also a potent innovative manufacturing technology for its ability to produce unique objects rapidly and affordably. And while most of us might not be up to the task of potent innovation, you’ll find plenty of that among the entries of the Hackaday Prize Competition.

This article DIY 3D printable Raman spectrometer could provide cheap & early detection of hazardous chemicals is first published at 3ders.org.