Monthly Archives: Juli 2014

Leave Your Mark on the City by 3D Printing Graffiti

By Scott J Grunewald

Dutch 3D designer Kees Kamper spent seven years photographing some of the best graffiti that Amsterdam threw up on its walls. Inspired by that experience, and his Leapfrog 3D Printer, he’s decided to 3D print his own graffiti and photograph it out in the wild.

3D printed graffiti isn’t a wholly new idea, but it’s usually artwork created to look like traditional inner city graffiti, not 3D printed objects used to tag public walls and buildings. After seeking out and studying graffiti for so many years, Kamper thought that 3D printing could be used to make the same sorts of statements that traditional street art does.…

The original post Leave Your Mark on the City by 3D Printing Graffiti appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Imagining and Pondering the Ethics of a World 3D Printed by Bees

By Scott J Grunewald

From termites in Africa and their insect-scale skyscrapers to the innocuous honey bee and their intricate hives, nature has been “3D printing” for longer than we can measure. A former Gizmodo editor imagines a scenario where we turn bees into living concrete producing 3D printing machines. But what are the ethical ramifications of co-opting nature and turning it into an exploitable labour resource?

Science fiction stories are full of tales of humanity’s hubris turning apocalyptic when we mess with mother nature, and the scenario envisioned by former Gizmodo EiC Geoff Manaugh and his friend John Becker is no different.…

The original post Imagining and Pondering the Ethics of a World 3D Printed by Bees appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

New Inexpensive Open Sourced 3D Printed Hydroponics System Launches on Kickstarter

By Scott J Grunewald

While the creators of 3Dponics are looking for about $2,500, it isn’t really to start a business, they just want to start a community around their product. 3Dponics is completely open source and all of the 3D printable parts are available on Thingiverse for free. The real goal of their Kickstarter campaign is to help spread the word about their easy to use eco-friendly hydroponics system.

The concept of 3Dponics starts with an easy to use and open sourced hydroponics system that will allow you to turn almost any small space into a simple home garden using 3D printable parts and recycled materials.…

The original post New Inexpensive Open Sourced 3D Printed Hydroponics System Launches on Kickstarter appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Crowdfunding & The Low-Cost Desktop 3D Printer: A Suicidal Race To The Bottom? (Part 4)

By Land Grant

Welcome back  — for Part 4 of our series on Crowdfunding, 3D-printer ‘Preneurs and suicidal gaming of the new 3DP/startup/mob-VC “ecosystem.” Here’s a quick recap (with direct links back to previous “Parts” for your ready reference):
In Part 1 of this series, I presented an introductory view of Crowdfunding vis a vis 3D Printer Startups and the dynamism, democratization, distortions and dangers this new and novel mode of bankrolling startups engenders.
In Part 2, I looked into Kickstarter — the favorite engine of this 3D printer-Crowdfunding — as far as I could peer.…

The original post Crowdfunding & The Low-Cost Desktop 3D Printer: A Suicidal Race To The Bottom? (Part 4) appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Versoteq’s PicShade Project Is Turning the Lights On Personalized Manufacturing

By Davide Sher

Versoteq is a Finnish company that we have covered from time to time over the past few months as they are focused on making 3D printing accessible to as many people as possible. Their first projects have been based on using the possibilities offered by 3D printing to cater to the needs of people with impaired vision making the worlds of arts and sports more accessible to them through physical 3D copies and physical maps of the surroundings.
Capitalizing on this experience Versoteq is now trying to address the wider public through the promise of personalized manufacturing.…

The original post Versoteq’s PicShade Project Is Turning the Lights On Personalized Manufacturing appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

For Pipeline Inspection Company IIS, Using 3D Printing Continues to be an Easy Choice

By Scott J Grunewald

Over on Afinia’s blog Industrial Inspection Systems owner and CEO discusses how rapid prototyping has helped his company become more adaptable to his clients needs, and why they chose Afinia 3D Printers to do it.
3D printing isn’t a new technology to IIS as they adopted it years ago when the only desktop 3D printers on the market were made of laser cut balsa wood. It was immediately a useful tool for their company, and it has been a part of their business ever since.…

The original post For Pipeline Inspection Company IIS, Using 3D Printing Continues to be an Easy Choice appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Steve Wozniak and Lithuanian Celebrities Help the Blind See with 3D Printed Models

By Scott J Grunewald

How much of the way that you perceive the world is based on the way that you see it? Do you choose the clothing that you wear based on how it looks? What about a romantic partner? If you did not have sight, you would obviously have to choose those things based on other criteria, but if you couldn’t see, how would you understand the concepts of colour or beauty as the sighted perceive them? Could you ever really understand them?…

The original post Steve Wozniak and Lithuanian Celebrities Help the Blind See with 3D Printed Models appeared first on 3D Printing Industry.

Japanese tradtional craft meets 3D printing: Kabuku introduces ''mOment' accessories

Shibuya, Tokyo based Japanese company Kabuku released this week a new fashion accessory brand 'mOment' KUMO that integrates 3D printing technologies and Japanese traditional dyeing technique. The company began selling 'mOment' collections on 3D printing marketplace 'rinkak' on July 29, 2014.

This article Japanese tradtional craft meets 3D printing: Kabuku introduces ''mOment' accessories is first published at 3ders.org.

Photochemical Machining Goes Bohemian

Digital fabrication meets ancient jewelry making techniques

Rachel Dropp is the one-woman operation behind Raw Elements Jewelry, a brand that combines modern Photochemical Machining (PCM) with traditional jewelry-making techniques. The results are unique hand-crafted pieces that feature a raw, unique style.

The pieces in the Raw Elements Jewelry line drawn inspirations everywhere from French needle point lace to the phases of the moon.

“While creating new collections I adhere to 3 aesthetic themes: rustic nature, bohemian and sacred geometry.”

The pieces are designed by Dropp, who then hammers, polishes, patinas and does the final soldering to arrive at her finished product. “I love incorporating all of the processes” Dropp says, “because it keeps things interesting and it allows me to have a great mix of products to offer to my customers.”

As someone who enjoys working on the creative side, Rachel initially found it difficult to jump into sales. “I’ve had to step outside my comfort zone” Dropp says “to call boutiques that I feel would be interested in selling my wares and to make appointments”.

Stepping out of her comfort zone has paid off for Dropp, who’s jewelry is now available online on her website and Etsy store as well as in boutiques everywhere from Sonoma County to the San Francisco Bay area

I asked Rachel what was on the horizon for Raw Elements Jewelry. “Coming up in August, I will be attending the Bodega Bay Seafood Art and Wine Festival and then in the beginning of September I will have a booth at Bhakti Fest in Southern California. I also plan to launch a new collection of mini sacred geometry charm necklaces.”

You can purchase Raw Elements Jewelry online at rawelementsjewelry.com or at any of the stores and boutiques listed on her site.

Inspired to design your own product line? Make it with Ponoko!

How to Create Custom Pendants and Necklaces With JWEEL

Want to design your own 3D printed heart-shaped pendant in under an hour?

We did! You might have heard about JWEEL, a free browser-based jewelry design software. It has a built-in feature that lets you 3D print your own necklaces, charms, and rings in gold, silver, brass, and other materials— without making you check your model for printing flaws. It does that for you, so it’s a great way to quickly create custom jewelry designs.

We asked an employee who never designed jewelry before to create a heart-shaped pendant using JWEELRead on to see how they did it, and how you can, too!

But first, grab a clickwheel mouse and log in to JWEEL!

A photo of a clickwheel mouse.

JWEEL is very easy to use with a clickwheel mouse. Go get one. We’ll wait.

Here are the basic keystrokes for JWEEL:

Zoom: Hold down Z and roll the click wheel

Rotate view: Hold down right click and move your mouse.

DELETE: First press D, and then Left click. Do not click both at the same time.

Make a new “limb” and/or “sphere:” Double click on a sphere. Another ball will appear for you to drag around. It is a separate ball from the ball you clicked.

Move “balls” or “limbs” around: Click a ball. Hold down the left mouse button and drag your mouse at the same time.

Make a “ball” larger or smaller: Click a ball and roll the click wheel back and forth. Now, check out this visual work flow:

1. The Default Screen

JWEEL Screenshot

This is how it looks when you start a project. There is a basic three-“limb” teardrop design.

2. Select a sphere by clicking on it.

JWEEL Screenshot

Note that we have “Symmetries” turned on. You can turn it off or change its direction via the  “Symmetries” menu section on the middle-left side of the screen… right below “save.”

3. Delete the entire “limb” it by clicking your DELETE key. Do the same for the other one.

JWEEL Screenshot

4. Select bottom sphere and double click. Select the new ball that appears, and drag it up and away from the center.

JWEEL Screenshot

5. Join the balls together at the top, to form a heart.

JWEEL lets you intersect and combine parts by dragging and dropping them around. No need to calculate wall thickness or worry about manifold edges...

JWEEL lets you intersect and combine parts by dragging and dropping them around. No need to calculate wall thickness or worry about manifold edges…

6. Create a new limb.

JWEEL Screenshot

To make a “sphere” or “limb,” double click on an existing sphere. Another ball will appear for you to drag around. It is a separate ball from the ball you clicked. Click down on the new sphere you generated, hold down your mouse drag the sphere until you see it stretch into a limb. Drag the limb through the heart.

7. Use Your New Knowledge to Create an Arrow Shape That You Like.

JWEEL Screenshot

Click on the spheres and keep creating new limbs and dragging around balls until you get the shape you want! Our secret volunteer had so much fun with this part that they spent 30 minutes designing this complex, geometric cube-like shape for the arrow base!

8. Click “View My Pendant.”

JWEEL rendered preview of a gold colored brass heart

The final render can be embedded on websites, Facebook, and social media for free.

Now you can either save your design on the free server, or send it off to the 3D printer. We chose to print it our design:

We chose to print our design in brass, the cheapest material. Would you guess this was made by someone who never designed jewelry before?

We chose to print our design in brass, a budget-friendly material. Would you guess pendant was made by someone who never designed jewelry before?

That’s all there is to it! Now Check out some of the beautiful pendant designs in JWEEL’s community user designs gallery, such as this one by Angelola: