Category Archives: André R. Studart

Empa cellulose 3D printing advances yield guidelines for composite material tuning

A group at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Empa, is investigating ways to 3D print cellulose. As the most abundant organic polymer in the world, the material is sustainable, and biocompatible, presenting great potential for medical research. Recent progress made at Empa demonstrates how to 3D print cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as […]

Empa cellulose 3D printing advances yield guidelines for composite material tuning

A group at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Empa, is investigating ways to 3D print cellulose. As the most abundant organic polymer in the world, the material is sustainable, and biocompatible, presenting great potential for medical research. Recent progress made at Empa demonstrates how to 3D print cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as […]

Q&A: Silvan Gantenbein PhD Candidate ETH Zürich, 3D printing complex materials

Recently the Complex Materials Group and Soft Materials Group at ETH Zürich, Switzerland, collaborated to develop a low cost, recyclable and high strength liquid crystal polymer (LCP) material for 3D printers. To learn more about this carbon fiber competitor I spoke to Silvan Gantenbein, co-author of the LCP study and PhD Candidate with the Complex Materials Group at ETH, about bioinspired design, […]

ETH Zürich develops carbon fiber rival for desktop 3D printers

Wood and spider silk have inspired the development of a new desktop 3D printable material that reportedly outperforms “state-of-the-art printed polymers”. Developed by a team of researchers at ETH Zürich, Switzerland, this bioinspired material contains liquid crystal polymer (LCP) particles that rival the use of glass and carbon fiber reinforcements. A more sustainable alternative to […]

ETH Zürich 3D printable “Flink” creates proactive bacterial microfactories

Bacteria grows in water-based hydrogels in a similar wold to mold that appears on the top of a forgotten cup of coffee. However, with a more solid consistency than coffee, hydrogels provide microbes with a structure, allowing them to multiply into more complex, three-dimensional shapes. Though the organisms would typically be unwelcome at any breakfast […]

3D printable nanocrystal ink from plant cellulose marks “important step” toward sustainable materials

A paper published in Advanced Functional Materials demonstrates a method for creating, and 3D printing, inks made from plant cellulose. 3D printed grids made from the …