Category Archives: Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering

MIT Implosion Fabrication 3D printing makes short work of microscopic objects

A collaboration between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard, has produced a new 3D printing-powered micro fabrication technique. Termed “Implosion Fabrication” or “ImpFab” the method takes a leaf out of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, shrinking 3D printed objects down to size. Shrinking objects to 10 times […]

Wyss Institute applies “try before you buy” initiative to 3D printed heart valves

A team from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Massachusetts, have created a 3D printing workflow to predict the performance of artificial heart valves. A kind of “try before your buy” approach, the researchers have created a software that simulates a valve’s reaction with a patient’s native tissue, and provides accurate […]

Wyss Institute leverages 3D printing to study Earth’s “forgotten fauna”

A 3D printed claw developed at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University is giving biologists a tool for finally understanding soft creatures that live at the bottom of the sea. “The dream is to enclose delicate deep-sea animals, take 3D imagery that includes properties like hardness, 3D-print that animal at the surface, […]

Thanks to MIT and Harvard brains can now be 3D printed by the pixel

A collaboration between MIT’s Mediated Matter Lab and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has yielded an image processing method that makes 3D printing patient-specific medical models a cinch. While accurate, and ready-sliced for 3D printing, manually processing MRI and CT scan data is a laborious process, typically done over the course […]

Harvard 3D prints robots embedded with sensors that react to objects like humans

Researchers from Harvard University have developed a method for creating soft robots with embedded sensors capable of sensing movement, pressure, touch, and temperature.  Inspired by the human “somatosensory system”, that gives us our physical abilities, the joint project between the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering […]

Harvard’s hybrid 3D printing method creates electronic second skin

The future of wearable technology envisions smart devices worn as close to the human skin as possible. Activated by “soft”, flexible electronics, this kind of second skin will enable seamless interaction between wearers and their technology, enhancing the human ability to make decisions and perform tasks. Using a hybrid 3D printing method, researchers at Harvard […]

Harvard-MIT liver chip narrows gap between in vitro and in vivo drug tests

3D bioprinting, microfluidics and hydrogel scaffolding combine in the latest liver tissue research by a team of scientists attributable to seven institutions from across the globe. Centralized at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the organ-on-a-chip device seeks to improve the way drugs are […]

3D printable nanocrystal ink from plant cellulose marks “important step” toward sustainable materials

A paper published in Advanced Functional Materials demonstrates a method for creating, and 3D printing, inks made from plant cellulose. 3D printed grids made from the …

Embedded 3D Printing for Soft Robotics Fabrication

(Nanowerk) A research team led by professors Jennifer A. Lewis and Robert Wood from Harvard University, have demonstrated a new method for creating highly stretchable sensors based on embedded 3D printing of a carbon-based resistive ink within an elastomeric matrix (for which they coined the term ‘e-3DP’). To enable e-3DP, the team developed a multi-component materials system composed of an ink, reservoir and filler fluid. These constituents are tailored to exhibit the desired rheological properties required to maintain high-fidelity geometries throughout the embedded printing and curing process. While attention has focused on 3D printing of rigid materials such as plastics and metals, this work demonstrates the printing of soft materials, which opens up myriad applications – including soft robots, actuators and wearable sensors.

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Embedded 3D Printing for Soft Robotics Fabrication

(Nanowerk) A research team led by professors Jennifer A. Lewis and Robert Wood from Harvard University, have demonstrated a new method for creating highly stretchable sensors based on embedded 3D printing of a carbon-based resistive ink within an elastomeric matrix (for which they coined the term ‘e-3DP’). To enable e-3DP, the team developed a multi-component materials system composed of an ink, reservoir and filler fluid. These constituents are tailored to exhibit the desired rheological properties required to maintain high-fidelity geometries throughout the embedded printing and curing process. While attention has focused on 3D printing of rigid materials such as plastics and metals, this work demonstrates the printing of soft materials, which opens up myriad applications – including soft robots, actuators and wearable sensors.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.