Category Archives: Science

TNO Adopts Food 3D Printing Tech for 3D Printing Pharmaceuticals

By Tyler Koslow

The Netherlands-based independent research organization TNO is far from a one trick pony; the collective has contributed numerous innovations in both 3D printing technology and beyond. Having already conquered 3D printing complete food products over the past couple of years, TNO has come to realize that the ‘ingredients’ used for food-based 3D printing are pretty much identical to those needed to 3D print pharmaceutical drugs. This has led TNO to expand their 3D printing technology into the medical field, and are now attempting to successfully 3D print biocompatible oral dosage forms (ODFs) for safe human intake.…

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3D Printing Brings Fresh Brewed Coffee to the ISS

By Tyler Koslow

Here on Earth, many of us can’t start our day off until we’ve had a sip of that first cup of coffee, and the astronauts in the International Space Station are no different. But due to the microgravity in the ISS, these astronauts generally have to drink instant coffee from a bag with a straw (yuck!). 3D printing technology has dabbled in the world of coffee on quite a few occasions, whether it be through caffeinating 3D printers with a coffee-based filament or conjoining a 3D printing store with a cafe in Berlin.…

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Future Engineers Calls on Young Trekkies to Design 3D Printable Eating Tools for Outer Space

By Tyler Koslow

There’s a lot of thought put into the way that astronauts eat when they’re out exploring the confines of our Solar System, implementing special packaging and preparation to ensure that spoilage won’t occur. Even on the International Space Station, astronauts still have to eat three meals a day, and, as we gear up to further explore the surface of our moon and beyond in the near future, we must continue to reinvent the way food is eaten in space. Future Engineers is reaching out to the youngest and brightest minds to help prepare the tools of the future that will help us eat in outer space, asking students from Kindergarten to 12th grade to create a digital 3D model of a non-edible, food-related object to be 3D printed in space in the year 2050.…

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This Might Be the Strongest AND Lightest Material Ever Seen in 3D Printing

By Tyler Koslow

One of the most scientifically mind-blowing materials ever discovered, graphene (an allotrope of carbon) has been praised for having an unbelievable combination of material characteristics, including low density, top-notch mechanical properties, thermal stability, and even electrical conductivity. In fact, graphene aerogel is one of the lightest materials ever discovered, reportedly weighing seven times less than air…But these great qualities only really hold true in graphene’s original 2D material composition, which are greatly diminished when graphene is made three-dimensional. That is until now.…

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The 3D Printed Mechanical Chameleon that Knows When to Go Camo

By Tyler Koslow

It seems that some pretty cool news snuck by most of the world last month in the scientific journal ACS Nano. Perhaps it’s because it involves an actual camouflaging mechanical chameleon!

The research, which was conducted by a collaborative team from China’s Wuhan University and the Atlanta-based Georgia Institute of Technology, was aimed at reaching ‘optical invisibility’ by covering a 3D printed chameleon model in a plasmonic display. What these plasmons (aka ripples of electrons) allow for is real-time light manipulation that adapts to the color of the surrounding environment.…

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NYC Startup Aims to 3D Print Bones with Patients’ Own Stem Cells

By Tyler Koslow

When the idea of a medical transplant is brought up, most people’s thoughts are usually drawn to procedures such as blood transfusions or organ replacements. But, oftentimes, we forget the importance of our bone structure, as well as the 2 million painful bone transplants that take place every year around world. Previously stuck in a Medieval-like operation method, surgeons had little option but to replace their patients’ bones with the bones of animals or human cadavers, and even this procedure can oftentimes led to complications due to the body’s rejection of the foreign replacement.…

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The $900 Renegade: Ourobotics Releases Fully Open Source Bioprinter

By Davide Sher

Take the lessons from Professor Pearce’s Open Source Lab (discussed in a recent article), add some low cost bioprinting (such as the systems recently released by BioBots, CELLINK and Ourobotics) and what you get is the Renegade, a new, fully open source syringe extrusion bioprinter, just released by Ourobotics.
The new open source system was presented by Ourobotics’ co-founder Stephen Gray at a recent bioChanges meet up (see video below), hosted by the Tangible Media Group at MIT Media Lab. “The Renegade,” Stephen explained, “is a joint project based on Jemma’s [Redmond, another co-founder of Ourobotics] and my own experiences.…

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Prof. Pearce’s “Open-Source Lab” Unleashes the Power of 3D Printed Lab Equipment

By Davide Sher

At 3DPI, we have had the opportunity to interview Professor Joshua Pearce from Michigan Tech a few times. That’s because he represents some of concepts that many 3D printer adopters appreciate and like to promote, in particular the use of low-cost 3D printing and other open source technologies directed toward sustainability, innovation, and discovery.
Many times, I have found myself quoting Prof. Pearce’s study on the savings derived from a single open source, 3D printed mechanical pump to exemplify the benefits of 3D printing in general.…

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